Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

Plagues
Plagues

Sculpture, 2017 Mixed media 8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

1/1

Plagues
Sculpture, 2017

Mixed media

8 x 10 x 15cm (each)

PLAGUES02.jpg

 The teeth can be seen as the primal basic tool that allows human survival, responsible for the first stage of breaking natural substrate into the energy that sustains the body.

 

The work was developed based on the original tooth molds taken from Yanomamis individuals during an anthropological expedition to Brazilian Amazonia made in 1971. Based on the original molds, the work recreates seven dental arches as the 'primal human tool' trapped into concrete blocks, which refer to the industrial society habits and relationships restricted and organized by concrete made structures. The history between industrial and indigenous societies has been mostly of oppression and destruction, besides the land exploitation and looting, being indigenous usually considered as plagues that should be dominated or exterminated.

 

More than 50 years ago, the anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss observed that the apparent technological simplicity of indigenous societies implies, in reality, worlds that are “a life worth living.” This simplicity, in reality, is an effect of modern myopia, whose idea of development leads us ever more into the abyss. The supposed conquest of development, said Levi-Strauss, exists only because of the destruction of indigenous societies, the looting of their mineral, and territorial resources.

 

The Earth is hidden under layers of concrete. It has become so prevalent in construction that more than half of all the concrete ever used was produced in the past 20 years. Humans have produced enough concrete to thinly pave the entire surface of the Earth. The concrete blocks relate to the industrialized society’s exponential growth, which demands more supplies, more production, and therefore, increasing exploitation of the resources and land that once was home to indigenous populations.

 

 

 

Plagues
Sculpture, 2017

Mixed media

8 x 10 x 15cm